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Single circuit generator transfer switch

Generator Transfer Switch Alt Single Circuit Furnace Pump BoilerThrough much interest from fans on my Youtube channel. I had an overwhelming amount of people asking me about transfer switches and single circuit versions good for powering a single piece of equipment like a gas furnace.

I have made several of these over the years, but I have never made them available for sale commercially. I did sell a few prototypes over the last 6 months but after little debate I decided to go all in and really make something special.

I have just released the first version of my transfer switches, the HTS15. It’s a simple single circuit manual transfer switch. Capable of controlling up to 15 Amps or 1875 Watts at 125 Volts AC.

To read more please go to Heezy.com or easytransferswitch.com

I have a series of videos I’ll be uploading over the course of the next week regarding the wiring and install of the transfer switch.

I hope everyone finds it helpful for their decision on whats the best route to go when deciding on how to power your gas furnace or other equipment with a generator.
They are available through Amazon and my site; easytransferswitch.com

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Comments

  1. Wayne Tyler says:

    Hi Rick

    Question:
    To have a gas furnace operate normally while supplied by a generator would you also need to supply power to the circuit used by the thermostat? If not will the blower motor run just continuously without the burner firing up or will the blower motor turning on trigger the burner to ignite and run the furnace full out until power is removed?

    Regards
    Wayne

    1. Rick says:

      The thermostat should get it’s power from the furnace so as long as you have it powered up it will operate as it normally would.

  2. mike says:

    Is there any way you can recommend on how to confirm this? Just want to be sure.

    Thanks

  3. Rick says:

    99.9% of the time the thermostat get’s it’s power 24 VAC from the control transformer inside the furnace. In all my years the only residential units I saw that didn’t have this were old Carrier units from the 60’s. Very rare situation.

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About Rick

I've been an HVAC/R Mechanic working in the Seattle area for over 15 years, specializing in the commercial service industry.. I’m also a Licensed Electrician & Gas Piping Mechanic and have numerous other trade related certifications. I’ve instructed at local trade schools and now continue teaching through this site.

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